FrOg On-Line #2000-05



Welcome to FrOg On-Line #2000-05, Thursday, August 31, 2000.


CONTENTS
========

1. Introduction
2. Publications
3. The Glowing Future
4. Collecting Reports
5. Miscellaneous
6. "Subscriber" List


1. Introduction
===============

Greetings.  I'm happy to report that neither the Franklin Mineral Museum nor
the Sterling Hill Mining Museum suffered serious damage from the heavy rains
that hit northern New Jersey in early August.  Nor, as far as I know, did any
of the people involved in the museums or the Franklin/Ogdensburg Mineralogical
Society.

In this issue, we've got new schedule information, collecting reports, and
miscellaneous items.  No featured specimen: no-one submitted a write-up.
Surely *someone* besides Chris, Dave, Mark, and myself has interesting
specimens?

Enjoy...


2. Publications
===============

The summer issue of the Sterling Hill Mining Museum Newsletter was mailed
Friday, August 18; I received mine Monday, August 21.  This issue contains
interesting news regarding John Kolic's recent work in the Passaic/Noble Pit
and fill quarry areas, and a good article about the 3000 pound geode (the
"Great Egg") being put on display in the Thomas Warren Museum of Fluorescence.

I received the following from Dan McHugh:

  Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 11:29:03 -0500
  From: "Daniel J. McHugh" <dmchugh@eee.org>
  To: "William C. Mattison" <mattison@thunder.nws.noaa.gov>
  Subject: Re: FrOg question.

  Hello Bill-- thanks for the back issue library of Frog. It helps out and met
  my requet. By the way, for your next issue can we get John C.or somebody to
  discuss the recent identification of Thorulite? It would be great to know how
  many specimens are out there, associations, size of crystals, coverage on
  specimens,etc. Thanks. Dan McHugh.

Dan's request was forwarded to John Cianciulli.  Here is John's reply:

  Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2000 19:32:27 -0700
  From: John Cianciulli <u1008042@warwick.net>
  To: "William C. Mattison" <mattison@thunder.nws.noaa.gov>
  Subject: Re: mineralogy request.

  Bill,
          Two new minerals to Franklin will be announced in the next P/T as
  well as a description of fluorescent clinochrysotile.  Once published I will
  be happy to send you the details.......JC

Peter Chin expects the Fall 2000 Picking Table to be out in time for the
Franklin Show.


3. The Glowing Future
=====================

Saturday, September 16:
  mineral collecting, Passaic and Noble Pits -
       8am to 3pm, Sterling Hill Mining Museum Foundation members;
       9am to noon, FOMS members also.
  Micro group meeting(?), Sterling Hill Mining Museum.
  FOMS meeting and lecture, 1:30pm to 3:30pm, Franklin Mineral Museum.

Saturday, September 23:
  "Pond" (outdoor swap and sell), 6:30am to 6pm, Franklin Elementary School.
  Franklin Show, 9am to 6pm, Franklin Elementary School.
  FOMS banquet, program, and auction; Lyceum Hall of the Immaculate Conception
       Church, south end of Main Street in Franklin -
    banquet starts 6:30pm; all-you-can-eat Italian buffet with soda, tea,
         and coffee; BYOB.
    program speaker is Jay Lininger (publisher and editor of Matrix).
    auction after the program benefits FOMS; auctioneer is Vandall King;
         auction items may be earmarked for the benefit of the Picking Table
         Color Fund.

Sunday, September 24:
  "Pond" (outdoor swap and sell), 8am to 5pm, Franklin Elementary School.
  Franklin Show, 10am to 5pm, Franklin Elementary School.
  mineral collecting, Passaic and Noble Pits, 10am to 3pm, open to the public.
  silent auction and sale, Paul and Irene Chorney collection, 1pm to 3pm,
       Sterling Hill Mining Museum GeoTech Center.

Saturday, October 21:
  FOMS field trip, Buckwheat Dump, 9am to noon.
  FOMS meeting and lecture, 1:30pm to 3:30pm, Franklin Mineral Museum.
  mineral collecting, Passaic and Noble Pits, 6:30pm to 9:30pm, Sterling Hill
       Mining Museum Foundation members only.  Each person must have a
       flashlight.

Sunday, October 22:
  FOMS field trip, Lime Crest Quarry, Limecrest Road, Sparta, NJ.

Sunday, October 29:
  mineral collecting, Sterling Hill Mining Museum mine run dump, 10am to 3pm.
  outdoor flea market, 10am to 3pm, Sterling Hill Mining Museum.

Saturday, Novenber 04:
  Fall Night Dig, Buckwheat Dump, 7pm to 10pm.

Saturday, Novenber 18:
  FOMS field trip; Franklin Quarry, Cork Hill Rd., Franklin, NJ; 9am to noon..
  FOMS meeting and lecture, 1:30pm to 3:30pm, Franklin Mineral Museum.

Sunday, November 26:
  mineral collecting, Sterling Hill Mining Museum mine run dump, 10am to 3pm.
  outdoor flea market, 10am to 3pm, Sterling Hill Mining Museum.


4. Collection Reports
=====================

>From Chris Thorsten:

  Date: Mon, 07 Aug 2000 14:20:56 -0400
  From: Chris <chris@atomic-pc.com>
  To: "William C. Mattison" <mattison@thunder.nws.noaa.gov>
  Subject: Re: questions.

  Hi Bill,

  [...]


  collecting reports:
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Mine Run Dump, Sterling Hill, last Sunday in July:

  By a field collector's standards, the weather wasn't so bad- intermittent
  rain all day, but at least there was no sun to roast us as we hammered away
  on the rocks.  As usual, I was looking for anything interesting- whether it
  be crystals, fluorescent minerals, or micromount material.  I dug into the
  ore piles and found a piece with a decent amount of purplish sussexite!  It
  was clearly a fresh one, not a piece from an old collection.

  I also found some mildly altered ore with more of the unidentified, whitish,
  acicular or tufted crystals in small pockets throughout.  I have found
  several of these over the past half dozen or so trips to Mine Run, but that's
  because I am constantly on the lookout for them.  These crystals do not
  fluoresce...  are they perhaps chlorophoenicite?  I'm not sure, but would
  like to have an accurate label for them when I trade with other micro
  collectors.  The crystals are visible under 10x, but probably best under
  about 30x.

  -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Buckwheat Dump, July, 2000:

  I keep looking for those pieces of dolomite that might have the micro
  crystals of monazite (Ce) in them.  A certain collector I know has a knack
  for finding these...  though I had never yet found one, despite many feverish
  searches under the noonday sun.  Every time I go to the Buckwheat, which is
  fairly often, I make sure to take at least one chunk of the "sugary" dolomite
  in hopes of stumbling upon one of the minute, transparent yellow crystals
  gleaming in a pocket like a tiny, many-faceted gemstone.

  So far, no luck- until I was absent-mindedly looking over a potato-sized
  dolomite chunk I'd brought home a couple of weeks ago (in July)...  a 10x
  loupe revealed just such a miniature jewel, sitting by itself in its pocket
  of dolomite crystals.  Nearby were some small quartz crystals, and a bit of
  what appears to be talc.  There it was!  A monazite (Ce), or as it's rumored
  some of these specimens could be instead, a parisite (Ce ?).  Question is,
  where's the rest of the boulder it came from?  I don't quite remember...

  Happy digging,
  Christian Thorsten
  August 7, 2000


5. Miscellaneous
================

John Cianciulli forwarded a message from Elaine and Charlie Turansky:

[extracts]

  Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 20:13:26 -0700
  From: John Cianciulli <u1008042@warwick.net>
  To: "'Bostwick, Richard'" <rbostwick@spexcsp.com>,
          "Chin, Peter" <Peter.Chin@USPTO.GOV>,
          "DONALD_LAPHAM@fmc.com" <DONALD_LAPHAM@fmc.com>,
          "Earl R. Verbeek" <everbeek@nac.net>,
          George Elling <gelling@lehman.com>,
          "'Hecht, Tema'" <thecht@NYPL.ORG>,
          herb <herb@simpleTHINKING.com>, John Ebner <jcebnerjr@cs.com>,
          Larry Berger <lberger@interactive.net>,
          lee lowell <alowell@warwick.net>, Mark Boyer <mboyer@pace2001.com>,
          michin <michin@erols.com>, "mobaum@luscent.com" <mobaum@luscent.com>,
          steven kuitems <skuitems@eclipse.net>,
          "William C. Mattison" <mattison@thunder.nws.noaa.gov>
  Subject: [Fwd: Joseph D. Warinsky]
    From: "Elaine Turansky" <turansky@monmouth.com>
    To: <rockman@warwick.net>
    Subject: Joseph D. Warinsky
    Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 17:13:16 -0400

    Dear Mineral Friends,
    I am Joseph Warinsky's daughter Elaine, and I am writing to you hoping that
    you can share this with other mineral folk -- my dad passed away yesterday,
    July 21.  He was an avid rock hound, and with my mom was very active in
    FOMS.
    [...]
    We thank you all for your care and concern.  Sincerely, Elaine and
    Charlie Turansky

Don Newsome has a suggestion regarding the reporting of fluorescence:

  From: UVSYSTEMS@aol.com
  Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2000 15:00:13 EDT
  Subject: Re: FrOg On-Line #2000-04.
  To: mattison@thunder.nws.noaa.gov

  To: Bill (cc to Earl & Dick)
  From: Don Newsome, UV SYSTEMS, Inc.

  Thanks for the reports.  I appreciate you putting this FrOg On-Line together.

  Since much of the information in FrOg On-Line is a more scientific or 
  technical nature, I would like to offer a suggestion for everyone.

  We know that at least one non-Franklin calcite (from Muzquiz, Coahuila) will
  fluoresce different hues (color) under the two different LW radiations (fl.
  salmon or straw color under about 351 nm and pink under 368 nm).  We might
  expect that they might be some fluorescent mineral(s) in the Flk & SH areas
  that might fluoresce differently under those two LW wavelengths (about 350 nm
  or about 368 nm).  Therefore, it might be a good idea to define what lamps
  (bulbs) or at least what UV lights were used when a fluoresce is described.
  Frankly, after all this time it might not be a big thing for LW UV, but the
  practice might be a good idea anyway.

  My major point is that MW (Medium Wave or Middle Wave [we don't ever have a
  standard terminology]) lamps (bulbs) used for defining fluorescent colors
  should be defined in any articles.  With LW phosphors in LW fluorescent lamps
  there are only two phosphors that are used in production lamps, the
  approximately 350 nm and the approximately 368 nm, and those phosphors are
  never mixed in one lamp.  HOWEVER, for MW that is not true.  There are
  commercial MW phosphors that have a peak wavelength at 326 nm, at 312 nm, at
  306 nm, and at 302 nm.  A lot of MW fluorescent lamps are manufactured for
  the Suntanning Industry, and those lamps could find there way into the
  fluorescent mineral collecting arena.  Most (but not all) of those Suntanning
  lamps are a mixture of two or more phosphors, which of course leads to more
  different lamps being used.  The result is there MIGHT be some fluorescent
  minerals that could show one response under one type of MW light with a
  specific MW lamp, and someone else might have a different light with a
  different lamp and therefore his or her fluorescent results might be
  different.  Right now there is no easy way to tell what MW phosphor (or
  phosphor blend) is used in a specific lamp.

  I would like to suggest that when reporting the results of MW fluorescence
  for publication that the make and model of the UV light be recorded.  Then
  any researcher could later determine the exact lamp that was used in that
  specific UV light from that manufacturer.  Just a suggestion.

  Don Newsome


6. "Subscriber" List
====================

NJ   Larry Berger        lberger@interactive.net
NC   Alan Borg           aborg@brinet.com
NY   Dick Bostwick       rbostwick@worldnet.att.net
NJ   Mark Boyer          mboyer@pace2001.com
CA   Kevin Brady         kbrady@cslanet.cals
PA   Bob Carnein         ccarnein@eagle.lhup.edu
VA   Peter Chin          Peter.Chin@USPTO.GOV
NJ   John Cianciulli     rockman@warwick.net
NJ   John Corsello       corsello@bellatlantic.net
FL   Sandra Downs        SdownsFLA@aol.com
NY   Howie Green         Royal53@worldnet.att.net
MD   Gary Grenier        william.grenier@mercantile.net
MN   Tim Hanson          tim@ens.net
NY   Tema Hecht          thecht@worldnet.att.net
CA   Andy Honig          andym@lightspeed.net
CA   Mark Isaacs         isaacsmark@hotmail.com
MI   John Jaszczak       jaszczak@mtu.edu
NY   Carl Kanoff         MCDKan@clarityconnect.com
NJ   Steve Kuitems       skuitems@eclipse.net
FL   Roy Lambert         rlambert@ufl.edu
NY   Donald Lapham       donald_lapham@fmc.com
PA   Jay Lininger        matrix@redrose.net
PA   Mike Logan          mikelogan@sprintmail.com
MD   Bill Mattison       mattison@thunder.nws.noaa.gov
CA   Dan McHugh          dmchugh@eee.org
VA   Curt Michanczyk     CurtMich@aol.com
CA   Doug Mitchell       DMitchell@compuserve.com
CO   Pete Modreski       pmodresk@usgs.gov
WA   Don Newsome         uvsystems@aol.com
NJ   Jeff Osowski        jvotmo@blast.net
AZ   George Polman       polmans@compuserve.com
NJ   Nathan Schachtman   nschacht@voicenet.com
NY   Paul Shizume        s1153fam@aol.com
MD   Steve Shramko       steven@cyberocks.com
NJ   Dave Slaymaker      dh10000@yahoo.com
CA   Jane Grover-Smith   ANGLESEA@webtv.net
CA   Kent Smith          kentnorwood@email.msn.com
NJ   Chris Thorsten      chris@atomic-pc.com
NJ   Jim Tozour          jtozour@home.com
NJ   Earl Verbeek        everbeek@nac.net
NM   Dru Wilbur          dwilbur@nmt.edu
VA   David Woolley       DAVEWOOL@webtv.net
     Herb Yeates         herb@simplethinking.com             Japan
CA   Wayne Young         Wayney@us.ibm.com

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